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rights to trademark 'Timex.'" I have confirmed with Mr. Carl Rosa, historian and curator at the Timexpo Museum in Waterbury, CT, that this is indeed the watch.
It is interesting: Based on the McDermott research, the watch appears to have been shipped in 1944, probably made that same year, or maybe 1943. There was no civilian watch production at US Time, and presumably a watch designed to be worn by nurses was considered to have been in the vital interest of the war effort. Well, not a military watch, but definitely a wartime production watch (cont.)
The first ever Timex watch, from US Time.
ca. 1944 "Timex" Nurses pendant type watch, on retractable chain.
This is not only one of the weirdest and most interesting of Timex watches, it's also their first! The US Time Corporation had been making clocks with the "Timex" name for a short time before this, but the Timex name first appeared on a watch, in this prototype model. The story is elsewhere, but briefly, US Time was making watches and clocks before WWII. During the war, like most other industries, the US Time factories were converted to war production. Civilian watchmaking came to a halt, mostly... (cont)
The US Time Corporation, anticipating an eventual resumption of civilian watch production after the war, decided to embark upon the creation of a new type of watch, based on new science and technologies. While the US Time factories made fuse timers, and other supplies for the war effort, some scientists at US Time were busy with plans for the new watch. Part of this plan was to inform the public of the existence of the watch, even though it was not yet available. Ads proclaimed, "You can't buy yours yet.. even if it's several months before your dealer has them.. be patient, we're still at war work. You'll find them."

This first Timex was not part of that campaign, but was probably made in 1943 or 1944 and not available to the public. According to the well-researched book, book by Kathleen McDermott,  Timex: A Company and its Community 1854-1998, "In October 1945, after using this name on a small trial shipment of nurses watches for a year - the very first time that the Timex name appeared on a watch - US Time received official
rights to trademark 'Timex.'" I have confirmed with Mr. Carl Rosa, historian and curator at the Timexpo Museum in Waterbury, CT, that this is indeed the watch.
It is interesting: Based on the McDermott research, the watch appears to have been shipped in 1944, probably made that same year, or maybe 1943. There was no civilian watch production at US Time, and presumably a watch designed to be worn by nurses was considered to have been in the vital interest of the war effort. Well, not a military watch, but definitely a wartime production watch (cont.)
This is a neat watch! It is in unbelievably good shape too. The case measures 27 mm across, chrome plate. The dial is clear and of high contrast. Outer minute chapter by 5 mins, in red. Blued steel hands, and nice red seconds. "Made in USA" and "Timex."

The watch body is attached to a 10 inch fine chain. The chain pulls out from the "button" spool, which has a pin on the back for the nurse to attach to her uniform. So the watch hangs upside down, but properly oriented for the nurse to read the time, and frees her wrist from a wristwatch. The spool part is particularly lovely, with pretty much perfect white enamel. The same treatment is on the back of the watch case (more.)
This was an amazing find. The watch winds and sets smoothly. It has been keeping time. I am tempted to look at the movement, but I've converted running watches to non-running by that manoever, so I'll leave it alone. Will I wear it? Well, it's gender-neutral enough isn't it? I'm not a nurse, but I can pin it to my chest and wear it to work maybe. Sure it will get odd looks. But it's the first Timex, and what could be more cool? Almost feel like my Timex journey is now complete, but who knows....  (few more pics below.) Thanks for reading, Alan.